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Jorgen Heizenberg

Return on Intelligence

I am happy to be part of the BeyeNETWORK team of thought leaders. I have a great interest in all things related to business intelligence, and I hope to blog about ways I see BI providing business value. In fact, I use a term, "return on intelligence," to describe the impact of delivering the right information, gathered from myriad sources, to a wide number of people which empowers them and their decision making.

I truly believe in the value of BI, especially in this economic downturn. If you have examples of positive return on intelligence or have topics you would like me cover, please contact me via this blog or at Jorgen.Heizenberg@capgemini.com.

About the author >

Jorgen Heizenberg currently acts as the Principal Technology Officer for the Business Intelligence (BI) domain at Capgemini in the Netherlands. He actively monitors the BI market for the impact on Capgemini and its clients. He is the author of many articles and white papers on business intelligence. Jorgen is also actively advising clients on business intelligence. Over the years, he has filled many different roles - all BI related, ranging from reporting specialist to BI strategy consultant. He has more than 10 years of experience on a operational, tactical and strategic level in planning, designing and creating management information solutions for a variety of clients and industries. He is known within the Dutch BI community for his original and often humorous approach toward BI. His ambition is to create a stronger focus on BI functionality and end-user benefits rather than on technique. You may contact him at jorgen.heizenberg@capgemini.com.  

Data Visualization HierarchyThose of you that know me or read my blog know that I am a strong advocate of visualization in Business Intelligence. I honestly belief that using images, charts, or other visual stimuli greatly helps users of a BI environment to quickly understand the data presented and work with it. I also think that great looking reports, dashboards or other BI products will be much more quickly accepted by business users if they just look nice. I often call this (within our Capgemini practice): It has to look super fancy sexy.Stephen Few is somebody who understand this and has written some great books about this as well (see http://www.perceptualedge.com/). Another believer is Hans Rosling with his Gapminder explorations (http://www.gapminder.org/). More recently I came across this website: http://www.informationisbeautiful.net/. This is a nice website where you will soon discover that data-journalist Davic McCandless take data visualization serious. His Tetris like animation comparing the financial crisis with let’s say the fight against hunger in Africa is brilliant.Definitely something to check out if you have a couple of minutes. I strongly urge all BI professionals to work on a visual intelligence strategy and framework. 


Posted January 7, 2011 8:11 AM
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Je kunt momenteel geen vakblad openslaan, internetdiscussie volgen of seminar bezoeken zonder dat er vragen worden gesteld over Cloud. Veel vragen komen voort uit het simpele feit dat mensen moeite lijken te hebben met Cloud als concept. Waarom kies ik voor Cloud, wanneer gaan we in de Cloud, waar liggen de voordelen en hoe zit het met de veiligheid op de Cloud? Al met al kun je wel zeggen dat er sprake is van een stevige hype. We willen het hebben, ook al weten we niet eens wat het is. Iedereen denkt er het zijne van en het gevolg is een overvloed van definities waarbij met name de verschillen in interpretatie tussen business en IT opvallen. En gemeenschappelijk element komt wel terug in al die definities, het gaat over ‘delen’ op n of ander niveau.Zie bijgaand artikel in de cloud special van DBMBusiness en IT samen in de wolken


Posted December 8, 2010 7:59 AM
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BIg BIrd

Yesterday my 13 years old son asked me (on MSN  by the way) if I was familiar with the term ”Infobesity”? To be honest I had heard of it but was unsure about the correct definition so I had to look it up. It quickly found out (Google) that the word is a combination of Information and Obesity and describes the poor nutritional value of information and not so much the quantity.  As there is a tsunami of information available at our fingertips we no longer feel the need to learn things by heart. Instead we ‘eat’ the small snack food like information we get every second or so from facebook, twitter, blogs. One of the things I found out is that all words that have ever been spoken out loud by human beings can be stored in approximately 5 exabytes of data. This year(2010) we expect that about 12 exabytes of information will be produced . By the way, an Exabyte is one quintillion bytes or 1 billion gigabytes or 1 million terabytes or...

So if we look at this increase in data (or Big Data as it is often called) we see many organization take a defensive approach in dealing with this ‘problem’. As many complain about the performance (of getting data in but also of getting data out of the datawarehouse) or memory (”must be faster let’s use flash”, ”must be bigger buy extra”). As a result we see all kind of technology driven solutions to deal with this increase. The rise of the datawarehouse appliances (Teradata, Exadata, Neoview, Netezza just to name a few) are the best examples of this defensive thinking. We create big mean machines, that we can actually see and hug, to fight of this beastly increase of data.

This traditional application centric or technology driven approach has gotten us into trouble over and over again in the past. It has led to situations where the organizational information capabilities, such as decision making, are based on hindsight. The organization is reactive, responding to events that have occurred in the past. In nice and fancy consulting speak: it results into a low transformational capability. In plain English: ”What the ****  just happened to us?”.

 I very much prefer to take a more information centric approach to dealing with this data increase. This path will enable organizations to address not only the ”what” but also the ”why” and can even lead to a ”what if?”.

A recent study (http://sloanreview.mit.edu/new-intelligent-enterprise/report-analytics-the-new-path-to-value/?r=d&utm_source=twitter&utm_medium=sm&utm_campaign=tnie-report) has showed that ”some executives remain overwhelmed by the well-documented ‘data deluge’ – 60% still say they ”have more information than we can effectively use. However this research also shows that leaders of the smartest organizations have moved past ”overwhelmed” and are already capitalizing on increased information richness and analytics to gain measurable competitive advantage”. It is about time that we start treating data not as an obstacle but as an opportunity. Let’s use this massive amounts of consumable materials and turn them into a strong offensive. Go team!


Posted November 8, 2010 1:38 PM
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Battle of the sexes

The renewed interest in open source Business Intelligence (Pentaho, Jaspersoft) could be considered as a clear counter reaction against the market domination due to (BI) vendor consolidation. Gartner in their 2010 Magic Quadrant BI paper come up with another explanation. They mention that ”economic conditions are driving interest in low-cost alternatives”. As a result ”organizations showed an increased willingness to consider open source for their enterprise BI platform deployments”. By the way, a lot of people think that Open Source also means for free. This is a misconception. But on the whole it does offer a lower TCO.

 Jaspersoft and Pentaho seem to be the two most likely open source BI vendors to be considered by organizations for this as their solutions seem to match those of the commercial BI vendors. Jaspersoft Enterprise Edition includes ETL capabilities from Talend but seem to be most popular for its reporting capabilities. Those capabilities include new web 2.0 functionality, drag and drop, a new meta data layer and Microsoft Windows and Office integration. Pentaho offers a more broader BI suite to its clients and has shown some cool innovations (BI for the Iphone) and strategic partnerships (Ingres, Inforbright).

So there seems to be as great potential in market growth for Open Source BI. At the one hand the industry analysts give a boost referring to the lower cost of ownership for Open Source BI and at the other hand the BI software market seems to be recovering showing a 10% growth in the Netherlands:(http://www.computable.nl/artikel/ict_topics/business_intelligence/3512364/1277145/bimarkt-is-terug-op-niveau-van-voor-de-crisis.html)

But still the battle remains and organizations feel that they have to choose between open or closed source BI, while in actuality both can coexist in any technical BI architecture.

So what is holding organizations back in the final adoption of Open Source BI? In my experience it is just fear of the unknown. What is OSBI? What can I do with it? Maybe it is time to get to know each other a bit better and start dating?


Posted September 15, 2010 1:35 PM
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Enterprise Data World is the business world’s most comprehensive vendor-neutral educational event about data and information management.I am honored to be invited to speak on Trends in Business Intelligence. Please join me wednesday, March 17th at 11:00 am in San Francisco, USA. Information is crucial to fight challenges but also in trying to identify chances and possibilities. What are the major trends in Business Intelligence and how is it impacting your organization? Capgemini explains how you can make use of data in order to make the necessary decisions under these fast changing circumstances.


Posted February 1, 2010 8:28 PM
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My video Interview with Hans Lamboo from DB Magazine on www.biplatform.nl is no longer online.However you can still find the material on youtube.http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=78Wa52Oxa2I


Posted February 1, 2010 8:19 PM
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Whatever happened to CPM or Corporate Perfomance Management?  Do you remember when it was on top of the hype cycle? Gartner defined it as ”... an umbrella term. It comprises all the relevant methods and all the processes, metrics and systems that enterprises put in place to measure and manage business performance”. Performance Management main objective is to improve the organizations performance and finds its starting point in the corporate strategy. Based on this strategy plans are made, results are measured and evaluated and actions are defined. CPM can even lead to new plans or strategies.

 

If we take a look at classic Business Intelligence we find that it is focused on using company data to report and analyze the current (or past) performance of the organization (lag). However, the Return-On-Intelligence (ROI) increases as organizations use this data to take a proactive approach in their decision making (lead). A good performance management framework therefore often consists of both lead and lag measures. 

 

Let’s break down the definition of CPM. Firstly, we take a look at ”relevant methods”. This refers to such methods as the Business Balanced Scorecard (Kaplan & Norton), Lean or Six Sigma. Secondly, it’s about ”processes”, or in other words a performance improvement process. The third element is ”Metrics and systems”. Another, widely accepted, name for metrics can be Key Performance Indicator or KPI. The system to support this would be Datawarehousing & Business Intelligence. But all these afore mentioned elements are used to ”measure and manage business performance”. And this means that CPM is focused on delivering a system with set of Key Performance Indicators to measure (by definition) past performance and use this to manage (or plan) future business performance.

Kaplan & Heizenberg 

So how is this different form the new number one on the hype cycle chart: Analytics? The main difference would be that analytics focuses not so much on measuring and managing but on analyzing data to gain insights and real understanding of (hidden) business performance. It is the next step in the evolution of Information Management. With CPM we can answer such questions as what happened and where (which we really need to know) but with Analytics we begin to understand the why. It will open up the road to not only making better decisions but maybe even the best decision.


Posted January 21, 2010 9:00 AM
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Whatever happened to CPM or Corporate Perfomance Management? Do you remember when it was on top of the hype cycle? Gartner defined it as an umbrella term. It comprises all the relevant methods and all the processes, metrics and systems that enterprises put in place to measure and manage business performance. Performance Management main objective is to improve the organizations performance and finds its starting point in the corporate strategy. Based on this strategy plans are made, results are measured and evaluated and actions are defined. CPM can even lead to new plans or strategies.

If we take a look at classic Business Intelligence we find that it is focused on using company data to report and analyze the current (or past) performance of the organization (lag). However, the Return-On-Intelligence (ROI) increases as organizations use this data to take a proactive approach in their decision making (lead). A good performance management framework therefore often consists of both lead and lag measures.

Lets break down the definition of CPM. Firstly, we take a look at relevant methods. This refers to such methods as the Business Balanced Scorecard (Kaplan & Norton), Lean or Six Sigma. Secondly, its about processes, or in other words a performance improvement process. The third element is Metrics and systems. Another, widely accepted, name for metrics can be Key Performance Indicator or KPI. The system to support this would be Datawarehousing & Business Intelligence. But all these afore mentioned elements are used to measure and manage business performance. And this means that CPM is focused on delivering a system with set of Key Performance Indicators to measure (by definition) past performance and use this to manage (or plan) future business performance.

So how is this different form the new number one on the hype cycle chart: Analytics? The main difference would be that analytics focuses not so much on measuring and managing but on analyzing data to gain insights and real understanding of (hidden) business performance. It is the next step in the evolution of Information Management. With CPM we can answer such questions as what happened and where (which we really need to know) but with Analytics we begin to understand the why. It will open up the road to not only making better decisions but maybe even the best decision.


Posted January 21, 2010 2:03 AM
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http://www.haarlemmermeer.nl/badhoevedorp/Please vote and make photo week 43 your choice so I can win!Thanks.


Posted January 20, 2010 6:43 PM
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A new book on BI will be published on January 26th during the Heliview Business Intelligence conference in FIGI ZEIST for which I wrote one chapter (On BI in Retail).

Front Cover BI Book

See also  http://bi.heliview.nl/

The title of the book is: Over business intelligence. Data is zilver, informatie is goud (About Business Intelligence. Data is silver, information is gold). 

The book can also be ordered for € 26,50 (excl. € 2,60 postage and packing) on www.uitgeverijtiem.nl.

You can also view the index and some summaries on this website.


Posted January 19, 2010 4:11 PM
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